THE YAKSHA’S TREASURE by Hemendra Kumar Roy (4)

by Jash Sen

Chapter 3 (continued)

 

I rushed to Bimal’s place as soon as it was light the next day. His door was always open for me. I went straight to his study and found him poring over his table, writing something, with the skull in front of him. At the sound of my footsteps, he quickly picked up the skull in an effort to hide it – then relieved at seeing me, said, ‘Oh, it’s you! I thought it was someone else.’

‘You were full of bravado yesterday, so why are you so scared this morning?’

‘Yesterday? Yesterday I hadn’t figured all the details out. I have realized that we have to do everything with the utmost caution from now on – no one should know anything about this.’

‘Could you understand the calculations?’

‘Everything that needed to be understood, yes.’

I jumped up in joy, shouting, ‘You understood everything? Really?’

Bimal said, ‘Hush! Don’t shout! You never know who might overhear. Calm down and take a seat.’

I pulled up a chair and said, ‘Tell me what’s written in the skull.’

Bimal said slowly, ‘I couldn’t make out anything at first. When I’d nearly lost all hope after trying for four hours, I suddenly recalled something. Quite a while ago, I had read an English book which had explained many ciphers and codes at length. This book had mentioned that thieves and robbers in Europe often use a cipher not very different from this one. They allocate a number to every alphabet, so ‘A’ is 1, ‘B’ is 2, ‘C’ is 3 etcetera. I thought perhaps this skull employs something similar as its code. On trying, I found that my surmise was correct. Then I deciphered these symbols very easily.’

I asked eagerly, ‘So what could you make out after reading it?’

Bimal extended a sheet of paper towards me, saying, ‘The skull’s symbols are divided into 40 cells. I’ve arranged them in exactly the same way.

The sheet had the following words :-

behind

the

broken

shrine

the

pine

tree

from

the

trunk

base

ten

yards

east

stop

go

right

eight

yards

buddha

in

the

east

to

the

left

six

yards

ahead

three

rocks

dig

under

for

seven

cubits

and

find

your

path

I read the sheet, thinking how marvellously clever Bimal was.

Bimal said, ‘Let me explain the code to you. The script is divided into vowels and consonants. The vowels are given numbers from 1 to 5. So ‘A’ is 1, ‘E’ is 2 and so on. The consonants have likewise been given numbers as well. Here, ‘B’ is 1, ‘C’ is 2, ‘D’ is 3 etcetera.

When a word has a vowel, it appears next to the consonant in brackets. So 1(2) stands for ‘be’ and 6(3) stands for ‘hi’. When a vowel starts a word, it appears on its own. So (3) stands  the vowel ‘i’ and 11 under it stands for the consonant ‘n’ – ‘in’.

I picked up the skull to inspect it once more, but it accidentally fell on the marble floor with a loud crash. Picking it up immediately, I scanned it once and said, ‘Oh no! A bit of the skull’s nicked.’

Bimal asked, ‘Which bit?’

I said, ‘The first seven cells, – behind the broken shrine the sal tree – that bit.’

Bimal said, ‘Had this happened earlier, it would have ruined everything. But there’s nothing to fear now, I’ve copied the symbols on to a piece of paper. But we have to be very careful, it is best to keep the calculations and destroy the words now.’ Saying this, he tore the sheet of paper into shreds.

When required, we would be able to solve the code in five minutes, but no one other than us would be able to get at the message from the symbols on the skull.

(Translator’s comment: The code in the original uses Bengali script and the use of matras. I have had to modify a little so that the essence of it is clear to the reader.)

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